Jesus Wars: How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two by Philip Jenkins

By Philip Jenkins

In Jesus Wars, hugely revered spiritual historian Philip Jenkins (The subsequent Christendom) finds in bloody element the 5th century battles over Christianity’s greatest paradox: the twin nature of Jesus Christ, as either totally human and entirely divine. Jesus Wars is a needs to for the bookshelf of these who benefit from the paintings of Jared Diamond, Karen Armstrong, N.T. Wright, Elaine Pagels, and Alister McGrath, in addition to an individual drawn to early Christian background.

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Jesus Wars: How Four Patriarchs, Three Queens, and Two Emperors Decided What Christians Would Believe for the Next 1,500 years

In Jesus Wars, hugely revered spiritual historian Philip Jenkins (The subsequent Christendom) finds in bloody aspect the 5th century battles over Christianity’s largest paradox: the twin nature of Jesus Christ, as either totally human and completely divine. Jesus Wars is a needs to for the bookshelf of these who benefit from the paintings of Jared Diamond, Karen Armstrong, N.

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And if we consider it as operating from natural necessity, there is no need for it to be determined to its effect any more than there is any need for other natural agents to be determined to their effects. All such natural determination comes from the nature of the agent itself. We are back once more to the only possible reason for such natural activity: because it is what it is. Finally, there is no possibility of demonstrating that God is the final cause of the existence of this second intelligence, since it cannot be demonstrated from self-evident principles or from experience that any being can produce an effect, unless it be an effect which we can experience in an order subject to that being.

One could grant every statement Ockham makes because all of them miss the essential points of the argument which he is attacking. The reason for this attitude is made clearer in the seventh Quodlibet, where Ockham asks whether it can be proved from final causality that God is intrinsically infinite. ”27 For a moment we are led to think that Ockham is attacking the very heart of the argument; that he is denying that the will of its very nature is ordered to anything beyond the created. But in the next few sentences it becomes evident that what he means by “natural appetite” is something different.

3-4: “Unde, proprie loquendo, quaelibet causa proprie dicta ad cuius praesentiam potest poni effectus et ipsa non-praesente non potest poni, potest dici causa immediate. Et ex hoc sequitur quod causa remota non est causa, quia ad eius praesentiam non sequitur effectus. Aliter Adam posset dici causa mei; quod non est verum quia non-ens non potest dici causa entis. Et similiter causa et effectus, proprie loquendo, simul sunt et non sunt…. Et sic si Deus concurrit cum causa secunda, utraque est immediata” (OTh V, 61).

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